Dentist Blog
By Seaside Dentistry
April 23, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures

What could your best smile look like? Straight, bright, and complete would be most people's answer. However, if you have smile gaps, thatdental implants beautiful and functional smile can be far from reach unless you discover dental implants from Seaside Dentistry in Virginia Beach, VA. Dr. Jason Campbell uses dental implants to replace single teeth or to support full or partial prosthetics. Learn more about these modern dental marvels.

Effects of tooth loss

Several consequences of tooth loss:

  • Unattractive and embarrassing smile gaps
  • Recession of gum tissue and underlying jaw bone
  • Movement of remaining teeth toward the empty tooth socket
  • Compromised speech, biting and chewing

While tooth loss due to decay, injury or abscess sometimes is unavoidable, Dr. Campbell and his team at Seaside Dentistry do all they can to prevent this devastating condition. Also, they want you to know that if tooth loss happens to you, you have options--conventional dentures, bridgework, and, today's most stable and natural-looking choice, the dental implant.

What is a dental implant?

It's a screw-like device made of titanium metal. Placed in the jaw bone during an in-office oral surgery, the implant replaces the missing natural root. Over the ensuing weeks, the jaw bone adheres to the implant through an amazing process called osseointegration. Once the site heals completely, your dentist re-opens the site and places an extension post and porcelain crown on the implant.

Then, what you have is a complete replacement tooth. Anchored in the bone, the bond between the implant and jaw actually strengthens as you bite and chew.

Now, if you have lost multiple teeth, you still could benefit from dental implant placement in Virginia Beach. Two to four implants may support a fixed bridge or even a full denture. Dr. Campbell assesses your oral health and jaw bone density before recommending any dental implant procedure.

Implant success

The Institute for Dental Implant Awareness states that these prosthetic teeth are made to last a lifetime, and research shows a high success rate for the procedures themselves--95 percent, in fact. A wide enough and dense enough jaw bone is critical to success as is routine aftercare consisting of:

  • Daily flossing around the implant site to reduce plaque and avoid tartar
  • Twice daily brushing, just as with your natural teeth
  • Avoiding smoking (a leading cause of implant failure)
  • Semi-annual check-ups and professional cleanings at Seaside Dentistry

The no-gap smile

You could be a candidate for dental implants from Seaside Dentistry in Virginia Beach, VA. Watch those gaps disappear, and feel and look your best when you smile. Contact Dr. Campbell's office team today to arrange an implant consultation: (757) 689-4363.

By Seaside Dentistry
April 14, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   oral hygiene  
4ThingsYouShouldbeDoingtoMaintainaHealthyMouth

Regular dental visits are an important part of maintaining healthy teeth and gums. But it’s what goes on between those visits — daily hygiene and care — that are the real ounce of prevention.

Here are 4 things you should be doing every day to keep your mouth healthy.

Use the right toothbrush and technique. Brushing with fluoride toothpaste at least once every day is a must for removing plaque, a thin film of bacteria and food particles which is the main cause of dental disease. Your efforts are more effective if you use a soft-bristled, multi-tufted brush that’s replaced often, especially when bristles become splayed and worn. To remove the most plaque and avoid damaging your gums, brush with a gentle, circular motion for at least two minutes over all tooth surfaces.

Don’t forget to floss. Your toothbrush can get to most but not all the plaque on your teeth. Flossing — either with flossing string, pre-loaded flossers or a water irrigator — helps remove plaque from between teeth. Don’t rely on toothpicks either — they can’t do the job flossing can do to remove plaque.

Mind your habits. We all develop certain behavioral patterns — like snacking, for instance. Constant snacking on foods with added sugar (a major food source for bacteria) increases your disease risk. Consider healthier snacks with fresh fruits or dairy, and restrict sugary foods to mealtimes (and the same for sports and energy drinks, which have high acid levels). Stop habits like tobacco use, excessive alcohol consumption or chewing on hard objects, all of which can damage your teeth and gums and create a hostile environment in your mouth.

Watch for abnormalities. If you pay attention, you may be able to notice early signs of problems. Bleeding, inflamed or painful gums could indicate you’re brushing too hard — or, more likely, the early stages of periodontal (gum) disease. Tooth pain could signal decay. And sores, lumps or other spots on your lips, tongue or inside of your mouth and throat could be a sign of serious disease. You should contact us if you see anything out of the ordinary.

If you would like more information on how to care for your teeth and gums, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “10 Tips for Daily Oral Care at Home.”

By Seaside Dentistry
March 30, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: teeth grinding   stress  
GetaHandleonStress-RelatedToothGrindingtoStopToothDamage

Modern life can be demanding. The body helps us rise to the occasion through responses we collectively call stress.

But while stress can be a good thing, it can also overwhelm us and manifest in some harmful way: bouts of back pain, stomach ulcers or even acne. It could also trigger tooth grinding, often occurring as we sleep. And like other stress relievers, tooth grinding can be detrimental to your health long term.

Teeth-on-teeth contact occurs normally when we eat or speak, or simply as our jaws contact each other with glancing touches hundreds if not thousands of times a day. Such normal contact is beneficial because it stimulates healthy bone growth in the jaw. But if the forces created exceed the normal range as with tooth grinding (up to ten times), it can cause a bevy of problems to the teeth and jaws.

While excessive jaw motion during teeth grinding can cause inflammation and painful spasms in the muscles, the greater danger is to the teeth, which could even fracture from the high amount of force. The more common occurrence, though, is an increased rate of enamel erosion, which causes the tooth to lose vital structure and eventually appear shorter in appearance.

Fortunately, there are ways to reduce teeth grinding or its severity. The first order of business is to treat its effects by reducing its symptoms and ongoing damage. We can recommend some behavior modification techniques to alter the frequency of the habit or a night guard to protect the teeth from the intensity of the habit if you’re unable to change the behavior.

A custom-fitted night or occlusal guard, a retainer-like dental appliance made of smooth acrylic plastic is designed so that the lower teeth glide over the guard surface when grinding and can’t make solid contact with the upper teeth. This reduces the generated force and helps protect the teeth.

In the long term, though, you should address the root cause — how you’re handling daily stress. Treatment by a psychotherapist or counselor, for example, could help you develop ways to channel stress in more productive ways.

However your treatment strategy develops, it’s important to address stress and teeth grinding as soon as possible. Controlling it will have long-term benefits for your teeth and smile.

If you would like more information on dealing with stress that causes tooth grinding, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Stress & Tooth Habits.”

By Seaside Dentistry
March 16, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: cosmetic dentistry  

Cosmetic dentistry is a great way to improve the appearance of your teeth. If you want to beautify your smile, then don't hesitate to contact cosmetic dentistryyour Virginia Beach, VA, dentist Dr. Jason Campbell.

Teeth Whitening:

There are two types of teeth whitening treatments provided: in-office teeth whitening or a take-home whitening kit.

The in-office procedure is quite simple and time-effective for the busy individual. Your Virginia Beach dentist will cover sensitive oral tissues, like your gums, and a device meant to retract your lips and cheeps will be placed in your mouth. The dentist will apply a strong whitening agent on the surface of your teeth and will allow it to sit for about an hour. When the hour is up, your dentist will remove the agent and your teeth should be whiter!

If you don't have time to visit your dentist for an hour, you can use the take-home whitening kit. A custom-made plastic mouth tray will be made for your teeth. One tray is used for the upper set of teeth and the other is used for the lower set of teeth. A whitening gel supplied by your doctor will be put in these trays, then placed over your teeth. In about an hour, your teeth should be whiter.

Dental Implants

If cavities have deteriorated your tooth, a dental implant may help you. Dental implants consist of replacing the tooth root with a titanium post and placing an abutment and crown on top. This will strengthen your teeth and improve the appearance of your smile.

Veneers:

When you come into the Virginia Beach office, your doctor will examine your teeth and assess whether veneers are right for you. Then a model of your teeth will be sent to a lab where a custom set of veneers matching the color of your teeth will be made for you. Veneers deal with stained or discolored teeth, and mishappened teeth like crooked, worn or chipped teeth.

If you have any questions or concerns, then don't hesitate to call your Virginia Beach, VA dentist Dr. Jason Campbell.

By Seaside Dentistry
March 15, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   gum disease  
ManagingGumDiseaseCouldBenefitOtherConditionsYouMayHave

Nearly half of all Americans have some form of periodontal (gum) disease. Without proper daily hygiene and treatment, this aggressive disease can ultimately cause tooth loss. It also appears the effects of gum disease reach beyond the mouth, as researchers have found relationships between it and other systemic diseases.

Inflammation, the body’s response to infection, is at the center of these relationships. In the case of gum disease, periodontal tissues become inflamed as the body attempts to isolate and fight the infection. If the inflammation becomes chronic, however, it will begin to damage gum tissues.

Inflammation is also a major feature of diabetes, a condition in which the pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin. Without enough of this hormone that transforms sugar into usable energy for the body, the sugar accumulates in the blood stream; as a result, the patient becomes more susceptible to an exaggerated inflammatory response when the body encounters an infection. This is especially true for periodontal infections: the resulting inflammation can be greater and harder to control in diabetic patients. What’s more, uncontrolled gum disease may worsen their blood sugar levels.

Although not as prominent as with diabetes, cardiovascular disease also seems to share a connection with gum disease. This collection of chronic conditions like high blood pressure or restricted blood vessel flow raises the risk of heart attack or stroke. Like gum disease, inflammation is a major component in the progression of cardiovascular disease — in fact, both diseases leave similar chemical “markers” in the blood that indicate their early development.

Ongoing research has also produced some promising treatment findings for both gum disease and inflammatory diseases, which also include osteoporosis, respiratory disease and rheumatoid arthritis. We’re now finding in many cases that treating one side of the disease connection can have positive effects on the other side. For example, diabetics who receive professional treatment for gum disease may see better blood sugar control.

With this in mind, the best approach is to practice effective, daily oral hygiene to reduce the risk of gum disease, coupled with regular office cleanings and checkups. Not only will this help you maintain optimum oral health, it may also contribute to better management of other conditions you may have.

If you would like more information on the relationship between periodontal (gum) disease and other diseases, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Good Oral Health Leads to Better Health Overall.”





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